STOP THE SPREAD OF ZEBRA MUSSELS!

This destructive invasive species can ruin shorelines, impact recreation, hurt aquatic life, damage boats, and even clog water intakes, costing taxpayers millions of dollars. If you’ve been on an infested lake and don’t properly clean, drain and dry your boat or gear, you are at high risk for spreading zebra mussels to other Texas lakes.

INFESTED LAKES IN TEXAS


NOTE: Click on a lake's marker to see the name of the lake and its level of infestation. Definitions of Levels of Infestation -- Infested Lake: has an established, reproducing population. Tested Positive: multiple/repeated detections of zebra mussels at that lake (but no reproducing population).


CLEAN, DRAIN AND DRY.

CLEAN, DRAIN AND DRY.

Zebra mussels start as microscopic larvae and grow to only 1.5 inches long. They can spread across Texas by hitching a ride on your boat, trailer or gear. Do your part to protect Texas lakes. Always clean, drain and dry your boat. It's the law -- fines up to $500.

If you've stored your boat on a lake that has been classified as "infested" or "tested positive", or find zebra mussels attached to your boat, call Texas Parks and Wildlife for guidance at (512) 389-4848 before moving it.

Learn more about zebra mussels.

IT’S THE LAW. FINES UP TO $500.

Possession or transportation of zebra mussels in Texas is illegal. Boaters must also drain all water from their boats, including live wells, bait buckets, bilges, motors and any other receptacles or water intake systems before leaving or approaching public waters. This applies to types and sizes of boats. Violations are Class C misdemeanors for the first offense, punishable with a fine of up to $500. Learn more.




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KEEP TEXAS LAKES FUN FOR EVERYONE.

CAMPAIGN PARTNERS

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has developed this public awareness campaign to stop the spread of zebra mussels. 
This campaign is made possible by a coalition of partners, including:

Tarrant Regional Water District  •  Trinity River Authority  •  City of Dallas  •  North Texas Municipal Water District  •  Sabine River Authority

San Jacinto River Authority  •  Guadalupe Blanco River Authority  •  Lower Colorado River Authority  •  Brazos River Authority  •  Coastal Water Authority

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center  •  Water Oriented Recreation District of Comal County  •  Upper Trinity Regional Water District