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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

Schinus terebinthifolius


Brazilian peppertree

Synonym(s):
Family: Anacardiaceae (Sumac Family)
Duration and Habit: Perennial Shrub


Photographer: Stephen D. Hight
Source: USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org

Description

The Brazilian peppertree can grow to 30 or 40 feet in height with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. Responds to abrupt changes in its environment with heavy growth, acting as an opportunistic pioneer species (the first species to establish in a disturbed area). This broadleaf evergreen small tree or shrub is well-laden with intertwining, drooping branches and foliage. Stems are yellow-green. Leaves are alternate, pinnately compound, and dark green, with 3-13 leaflets, each 1-2 inches long. A turpentine or pepper fragrance is given off upon crushing the leaves. Flowers cluster in small groups and consist of 5 small, white petals with yellow centers. Fruit are small red berries, 1/8 to 1/4 inch in diameter.

Ecological Threat: The Brazilian peppertree forms dense thickets, shading out native grasses, shrubs, and taking over native pine forests. Considered one of the greatest threats to native biodiversity for its dramatic affect on both plant and animal communities.

Biology & Spread: Plants can mature 3 years after germination and produce a large amount of seeds. Both male and female flowers bloom September through November; fruits December through February. Will also propagate at the base of the plant via adventitious buds (buds that develop in places other that at the end of a twig) sprouting from roots.

History: Sold and distributed in the 1800s in Florida as an ornamental; recognized as a nuisance weed in the 1950s. Sold as an ornamental in Texas. Its importation, sale, and distribution are now prohibited. Seeds can be transported by birds and mammals.Invades disturbed areas such as fallow fields, ditches, drained wetlands, and roadsides. Also invades native pine forests. Has a high tolerance for shade and low tolerance for cold temperatures.

U.S. Habitat: Invades disturbed areas such as fallow fields, ditches, drained wetlands, and roadsides. Also invades native pine forests. Has a high tolerance for shade and low tolerance for cold temperatures.

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced to U.S.

Native Origin: Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay (NatureServe Explorer)

U.S. Present: CA, FL, HI, PR, TX, VI

Distribution: Found in Florida, Texas, California, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Locally, established populations have been found on Galveston Island, in Dickinson, and on Virginia Point south of Texas City. Also established along the Lower Texas Coast.

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Schinus terebinthifolius
EDDMapS: Schinus terebinthifolius
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Schinus terebinthifolius

Invaders of Texas Observations

List All Observations of Schinus terebinthifolius reported by Citizen Scientists

Resembles/Alternatives

Management

For established trees, apply an herbicide containing glyphosate or triclopyr to the cut stump immediately after cutting, or apply triclopyr with a penetrating oil to basal bark 0.75 feet from the ground. Use foliar applications of herbicide for seedlings.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

The Quiet Invasion: A Guide to Invasive Plants of the Galveston Bay Area (www.galvbayinvasives.org). Lisa Gonzalez and Jeff DallaRosa. Houston Advanced Research Center, 2006.

Online Resources

Search Online

Google Search: Schinus terebinthifolius
Google Images: Schinus terebinthifolius
NatureServe Explorer: Schinus terebinthifolius
USDA Plants: Schinus terebinthifolius
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Schinus terebinthifolius
Bugwood Network Images: Schinus terebinthifolius

Last Updated: 2007-11-08 by LBJWFC
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