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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

NOTE: means species is on that list.

Bromus catharticus


Rescuegrass

Synonym(s): Bromus willdenowii Kunth, prairie grass, rescue brome, Bromus unioloides Kunth, Festuca unioloides, Ceratochloa cathartica (Vahl) Herter, Bromus haenkeanus (J. Presl) Kunth, Bromus brevis Nees ex Steud., Ceratochloa unioloides, Ceratochloa willdenowii (K
Family: Poaceae (Grass Family)
Duration and Habit: Annual or Perennial Graminoid (Grass)


Photographer: Robin R. Buckallew
Source: USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Description

Bromus catharticus is a relatively short-lived tufted grass that can grow up to 1 m tall. This grass has large, openly branched seed heads with a nodding appearance. The seed heads are made up of many flattened flower spikelets that are yellow in color. These seed heads are approximately 1.5-4 cm long and 4-10 mm wide. These flower spikelets are made up of 6-12 relatively large florets that are 12-20 mm long. The florets have short awns at the tip and break apart at maturity. The stems are robust, glabrous, and unbranched. Where the leaf meets the stem there is a small ligule approximately 0.5-4 mm long.

Native Lookalikes: Currently no information available here yet, or there are no native Texas species that could be confused with Rescuegrass.

Ecological Threat: Bromus catharticus can form dense swards. Thick concentrations of the grass can outcompete native plants and prevent natural regeneration.

Biology & Spread: Bromus catharticus has an active grow season in fall, winter and spring. The seeds may be spread by mowers, slashers, wind, animals, vehicles, and clothing.

History:

U.S. Habitat: Bromus catharticus is a common invasive weed of untended areas, roadsides, parks, disturbed soil, gardens, orchards, vineyards, drainage lines, and crops. Occurs in temperate, sub-tropical and sometimes semi-arid regions. Occurs in natural habitats such as dry coastal vegetation, grasslands, grassy woodlands, open woodlands, and riparian areas.

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced to continental U.S.

Native Origin: South America: Venezuela ;Brazil ;Bolivia ; Colombia ; Ecuador; Peru ;Argentina; Chile ; Paraguay; Uruguay

U.S. Present: AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, DC, FL, GA, HI, IA, IL, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA

Distribution in Texas:

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Bromus catharticus
EDDMapS: Bromus catharticus
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Bromus catharticus

Invaders of Texas Observations

List All Observations of Bromus catharticus reported by Citizen Scientists

Native Alternatives

Management

Prevent seed set for 1-2 years. Chemical: In degraded areas use 10 ml/10 L glyphosate on seedlings, young plants or when flowering.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=BRCA6&mapType=nativity http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/03030800-0b07-490a-8d04-0605030c0f01/media/Html/Bromus_catharticus.htm#Reproduction%20and%20Dispersal http://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/248

Online Resources

Search Online

Google Search: Bromus catharticus
Google Images: Bromus catharticus
NatureServe Explorer: Bromus catharticus
USDA Plants: Bromus catharticus
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Bromus catharticus
Bugwood Network Images: Bromus catharticus

Last Updated: 2013-11-21 by Kathryn D'Amico
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