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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

NOTE: means species is on that list.

Morus alba


White mulberry

Synonym(s): Morus alba L. var. multicaulis, Morus alba L. var. tatarica, Morus tatarica
Family: Moraceae  
Duration and Habit: Perennial Shrub


Photographer: Catherine Herms
Source: Ohio State Weed Lab Archive, The Ohio State University

Description

A small, 30-50 ft. (9.1-15.2 m) tall, deciduous tree. Alternate leaves are polymorphic, 2-8 in. (5.1-20.3 cm) long and shiny with blunt teeth and heart-shaped bases. Young bark, the bark along the roots, and the inner bark along the trunk are often bright orange in color. Older bark is gray with narrow, irregular fissures. Flowering occurs in April. Plants are normally dioecious (male and female flowers on separate plants). Male flowers are small, green and occur in 1-2 in. (2.5-5.1 cm) long catkins. Female flowers are inconspicuous and crowded in short spikes. White mulberry is very similar to the native red mulberry (Morus rubra L.), but may be distinguished by the leaves. White mulberry leaves have glossy surfaces whereas the leaves of red mulberry do not.

Native Lookalikes: Currently no information available here yet, or there are no native Texas species that could be confused with White mulberry.

Ecological Threat: Displaces native species, possibly hybridizing with and transmitting a root disease to the native red mulberry.

Biology & Spread: The seeds are spread by wildlife that feed on the fruits. It expands locally by producing new plants from its roots.

History: White mulberry is native to Asia and was introduced in colonial times as a food source for silkworms.

U.S. Habitat: White mulberry occurs naturally in sparse forests on hillsides at a wide range of elevations. It grows in part shade to full sun. It can grow in clay, loam, sand, acidic, alkaline, and welldrained soils. It tolerates extended flooding or droughty conditions.

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced

Native Origin: Asia

U.S. Present: AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY

Distribution in Texas: Throughout the US with exception of Alaska, Arizona and Nevada.

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Morus alba
EDDMapS: Morus alba
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Morus alba

Invaders of Texas Observations

List All Observations of Morus alba reported by Citizen Scientists

Native Alternatives

Red Mulberry (Morus rubra)

Management



Manual: Hand pull seedlings, cut trees, grind stumps, girdle large trees.

Chemical: Paint stumps with glyphosate

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Staff, Newtown Square, PA.: http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive_plants

Online Resources

Bugwood Network: invasive.org

Search Online

Google Search: Morus alba
Google Images: Morus alba
NatureServe Explorer: Morus alba
USDA Plants: Morus alba
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Morus alba
Bugwood Network Images: Morus alba

Last Updated: 9-29-2009 by HTG
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