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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

NOTE: means species is on that list.

Myagrum perfoliatum


Bird's eye-cress

Synonym(s): muskweed, dog mustard, mite cress, mitre cress,
cameline, Hohldotter, haldadra

Family: Brassicaceae- mustard family
Duration and Habit: Annual Herb


Photographer: Richard K. Murphy
Source: iNaturalist.org

Description

Myagrum perfoliatum is an annual herb that can grow up to 1 m. tall. The cotyledons are broad, giving them the distinct look of clubs. The leaves form rosettes that can reach 45 cm in diameter. The leaves are waxy, blue-green and hairless, and the leaves do not have leaf stems (petioles). They are clasping leaves. The stems are erect, blue-green, waxy and very branched. Flowers are pale yellow, 2-4 mm in diameter with four petals. The flowers are clustered. Pods are hard, wedge shaped 5-7 mm long and 4-5 mm wide.

Native Lookalikes: Currently no information available, or there are no native species that could be confused with Bird's eye-cress.

Ecological Threat: Myagrum perfoliatum considered a serious weed of broadleaf crops such as chickpeas, canola, lupins, faba beans, field peas and lentils. Bird’s eye cress is considered a potential seed contaminant. It can create blockages during harvest. It has competed with agricultural crops, reducing crop yields by up to 50%.

Biology & Spread: Myagrum perfoliatum thrives on alkaline clay soils, and spreads rapidly through productive agricultural lands. It can compete strongly with crops because of the rosette base. Seeds are thought to last up to 10 years in the soil. Heavily-infested paddocks can have up to 3000 seeds per square meter.

History:

U.S. Habitat: Bird’s eye cress grows best on alkaline clay soils. Found in agricultural lands.

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced to continental U.S., may be native in some parts

Native Origin: Asia: Western Asia, Caucasus, and Indian Subcontinent. Europe: Middle Europe, East Europe, Southeastern Europe, and Southwestern Europe

U.S. Present: OK, OH, TX

Distribution:

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Myagrum perfoliatum
EDDMapS: Myagrum perfoliatum
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Myagrum perfoliatum

Invaders of Texas Observations

List All Observations of Myagrum perfoliatum reported by Citizen Scientists

Native Alternatives

Myagrum perfoliatum resembles Rapistrum rugosum (bastard cabbage), Sonchus oleraceus, Lactuca serriola, Lactuca saligna

Management

Since Bird’s eye cress is tolerant to many commonly-used herbicides, control in agricultural crops is difficult. Herbicide treatment can be difficult to implement because germination occurs from April - October so seeds re-establish pre or post emergent herbicide treatment.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

Online Resources

http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=MYPE www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/156641/muskweed-alert.pdf

Search Online

Google Search: Myagrum perfoliatum
Google Images: Myagrum perfoliatum
NatureServe Explorer: Myagrum perfoliatum
USDA Plants: Myagrum perfoliatum
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Myagrum perfoliatum
Bugwood Network Images: Myagrum perfoliatum

Last Updated: 2013-07-25 by Kathryn A. D'Amico
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