Antigonon leptopus Hook. & Arn. (Coral vine )

 


Patricia M. Ciesla,
Bugwood.org

 

 

 

Family: Polygonaceae

Synonym(s): Mexican coral vine, Mexican creeper, confederate vine, queen's wreath, Corculum leptopum,

Duration: Perennial

Habit: Vine


Listed by:
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US: 1
Federal Noxious Weed: 0
TDA Noxious Weed: 0
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species: 0

Description: Antigonon leptopus is a rapidly growing vine that can grow to 25 feet in length. It grabs hold with tendrils and climbs. Coral vines has leaves that are cordate (heart shaped), sometimes triangular. The leaves are 2½ to 7½ cm long. The flowers are pink to white and are borne in panicles, clustered along the rachis. The coral vine blooms from spring to fall. Coral vine forms underground tubers and large rootstocks.

History: Coral vine is native to Mexico. It was introduced pre-1924 to the southeast and gulf regions of the United States as an ornamental, landscape plant.

Biology & Spread: Antigonon leptopus is a prolific seeder, but has many methods of reproduction. Seeds are able to float on water, which can spread the vine to many different areas. Fruit and seeds are spread by many animals, such as birds, raccoons, and pigs. When coral vine is cut back or damaged by frost or other environmental harm, the underground tubers can re-sprout, allowing the vine to spread further.

Ecological Threat: This vine spreads rapidly and can be weedy or invasive. Coral vine is a landscape, ornamental plant used for its climbing habit for fences and trellises. The coral vine spreads rapidly and can grow in poor soil and little sunlight, allowing it to flourish in areas that other plants can not. This plant spread by prolific seeding as well as underground tubers that will re-sprout. Coral vine will quickly cover forest edges and disturbed ground, climbing and covering structures and nearby plants, many of them native. This makes coral vine a successful invasive species.

US Habitat: Landscaped climbing, ornamental vine. Can grow in poor soils and varied light conditions. Grows well in disturbed soils, and at forest edge.

Distribution

US Nativity: Introduced to U.S.

Native Origin: Mexico

US States: AL, FL, GA, HI, LA, MS, SC, TX

Resembles/Alternatives:

Management: Manual & Mechanical: The first step is preventative control of coral vine. By limiting planting and removing existing plants within the landscape, coral vine can be controlled. If possible, removal should occur before seeds are produced. Care must be exercised to prevent seed spread and dispersal during the removal process. Continuous cutting will be effective in depleting food reserves, but this process will take several cycles. If plants are physically removed, underground tubers must be removed or plants will re-sprout. Biological: Chemical: According to the University of Guam’s Cooperative Extension Service, where coral vine is highly invasive, there are no herbicides registered for the use on coral vine. There is limited research and data on chemical control of coral vine. Spot treatment with glyphosate or triclopyr is the best recommendation at this point in time.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Listing Source

Texas Department ofAgriculture Noxious Plant List
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Prohibited Exotic Species
Invaders Program
Federal Noxious Weed
Union of Concerned Scientists
United States Forest Service Southern Research Station

Text References

Data Source

USDA NRCS Plants Database. Antigonon leptopus. http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=Anle4 UFL- IFAS Extension (2013). Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants: Coral Vine. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/40 McConnell, J. and R. Muniappan. Guam Pest Series, Agriculture and Natural Resources. Cooperative Extension System, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam.

Last Updated: 2013-12-30 by Kathryn D'Amico