Hovenia dulcis Thunb. (Japanese raisintree )

 


Bob Gutowski,
BioNET-EAFRINET

 

 

 

Family: Rhamnaceae

Synonym(s): Chinese raisintree, honey tree

Duration: Perennial

Habit: Tree or shrub


Listed by:
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US: 0
Federal Noxious Weed: 0
TDA Noxious Weed: 0
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species: 0

Description: Hovenia dulcis is a deciduous tree sometimes reaching to 10 m tall. Leaf blade ovate, broadly oblong or elliptic-ovate, 7-17 x 4-11 cm. The bark is rigid and light gray with brown valleys. Leaves are papery or thickly membranous. Leaves are alternate, glabrous or glossy and smooth. Leaf margin is irregularly serrate or coursely serrate, apex shortly acuminate or acuminate. Branchlets are brown or black-purple. Flowers are yellow-green, 6-8 mm in diameter in teminal or rarely axillary, asymmetrical cymose panicles. Sepals ovate-triangular 2.2-2.5 x 1.6 - 2 mm. Fruit is a red fleshy fruit that has the flavor of a raisin. Flowers May-July, fruits August - October. Leaves do not change color in fall and drop while they are still green.

History: Used for economic reasons such as a bee plant for honey production, an environmental ornamental plant, and fruit for consumption. Fleshy rachis is edible and used for making wine and candy. The timber is hard and used for construction and fine furniture.

Biology & Spread: Japanese raisintree is often cultivated for container planting or urban parking lots and landscapes. This is because it has an upright habit, showy flowers and fruit, and a moderate growth rate. Propagation is by seeds or cuttings.

Ecological Threat:

US Habitat: Hovenia dulcis is often used as an ornamental tree. Tree grows in full sun, partial sun, or sometimes partial shade. Soil tolerances: clay, loam, alkaline, acidic, occasionally wet, well-drained soil. Japanese raisintree has a moderate drought tolerance.

Distribution

US Nativity: Introduced to U.S

Native Origin: Asia -Temperate. China, Japan, Korea

US States: NC, TX, VA

Resembles/Alternatives: American basswood

Management: There has been no management efforts as there has not been significant cause as an invasive species.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Listing Source

Texas Department ofAgriculture Noxious Plant List
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Prohibited Exotic Species
Invaders Program
Federal Noxious Weed
Union of Concerned Scientists
United States Forest Service Southern Research Station

Text References

Data Source

http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=hodu2 http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200013347 http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=855 http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st296

Last Updated: 2013-11-21 by Kathryn A. D'Amico