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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
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Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

NOTE: means species is on that list.

Eragrostis lehmanniana


Lehman's love grass

Synonym(s):
Family: Poaceae (Grass Family)
Duration and Habit: Perennial Grass/Grasslike


Photographer: David Disselhorst
Source: Invaders of Texas Program

Description

Lehmann lovegrass is an introduced, warm-season, perennial bunchgrass growing from 1.5 to 2 feet (45-61 cm) in height. Its bunch habit is somewhat open in that individuals do not form a compact crown with numerous stembases. Furthermore, although more or less erect, some stems are procumbent and these often root at the nodes. This often results in somewhat continuous stands where individuals are difficult to identify. Lehmann lovegrass has short, involuted leaves, which are about 0.06 inch (1.5 mm) wide and 2 to 6 inches (5-15 cm) long.

Ecological Threat: People interested in maintaining native grasslands are concerned about Lehmann lovegrass's aggressive, spreading habit, and the displacement of native grasses. Lehmann lovegrass has replaced Arizona cottontop (Trichachne californica), threeawn grasses (Aristida spp.), and grama grasses (Bouteloua spp.) over much of the Santa Rita Experimental Range in Arizona. Lehmann lovegrass's ability to replace native grass species is attributed to: (1) its low palatability during summer, which results in cattle selectively grazing native grasses during the active growth period and thus reducing their vigor; (2) its ability to produce seed stalks early in the summer, which allows it to maintain itself when it is grazed; and (3) its ability to establish new stands from seed after disturbance.

Biology & Spread: Lehmann lovegrass reseeds itself quickly after disturbance. It is very competitive, and where adapted, tends to replace native grasses over a period of years.

History: It was first introduced in the arid Southwest in the 1930's for range restoration purposes. Between 1940 and 1980, ranchers and government land managers established Lehmann lovegrass on more than 172,000 acres (70,000 ha). However, because of edaphic and climatic requirements of the plant, most stands in Texas, New Mexico, and central Arizona disappeared within 5 years of planting. In 1988, Lehmann lovegrass was considered a major plant species on about 347,000 acres (140,000 ha), with the majority of this acreage in southeastern Arizona.

U.S. Habitat: Desert Shrubland, Chaparral, and Desert Grasslands.

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced to U.S.

Native Origin: Africa; S. Africa (BAIL)

U.S. Present: AZ, CA, NM, OK, TX, UT

Distribution: From Texas west to California, north to Utah.

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Eragrostis lehmanniana
EDDMapS: Eragrostis lehmanniana
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Eragrostis lehmanniana

Invaders of Texas Observations

List All Observations of Eragrostis lehmanniana reported by Citizen Scientists

Resembles/Alternatives

Management

Lehmann lovegrass may be killed with herbicide applications, followed by seeding of native species.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

United States Forest Service. 2008. Index of Species Information: Eragrostis lehmanniana. Accessed 21 November 2008: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/graminoid/eraleh/all.html

Online Resources

Search Online

Google Search: Eragrostis lehmanniana
Google Images: Eragrostis lehmanniana
NatureServe Explorer: Eragrostis lehmanniana
USDA Plants: Eragrostis lehmanniana
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Eragrostis lehmanniana
Bugwood Network Images: Eragrostis lehmanniana

Last Updated: 2008-11--24 by LBJWFC
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