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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

NOTE: means species is on that list.

Leucanthemum vulgare


Oxeye daisy

Synonym(s): Chrysanthemum leucanthemum
Family: Asteraceae (Aster Family)
Duration and Habit: Perennial Herb


Photographer: Mary Ellen (Mel) Harte
Source: Bugwood.org

Description

Ox-eye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) is a prostrate herb with stems that sprout laterally from a creeping rootstock. When in flower, the plant?s height ranges from one to three feet. The white-petaled flower-like inflorescences have yellow centers. Leaves are dark green on both sides, one to two inches long, smooth, and pinnately lobed or toothed. The number of flower stalks ranges from one to forty per plant.

Ecological Threat: Ox-eye daisy displaces native plant species, growing so densely it excludes other vegetation. While not considered poisonous to cows, it does impart a disagreeable taste to their milk. It is difficult to control or eradicate because of its large seedbank, long viability of seed, and ability to resprout if not completely removed.

Biology & Spread: Ox-eye daisy spreads through abundant seed production and vegetatively by rooting underground stems (rhizomes) (Griswold 1985). Seeds have no special adaptations to aid dispersal, but are small and fall to the ground up to two meters from the parent plant. When the flowerheads are dry, the seeds drop or are shattered easily by touch or movement. Water, human and animal foot traffic, and cultivating and earth-moving machinery can carry seeds into new areas.

History: Ox-eye daisy is native to Europe (Polunin 1969). It was probably introduced to North America as an ornamental early in the twentieth century. It is currently used as an ornamental, and is it often sold commercially in seed packets labeled as wildflower seed.

U.S. Habitat:

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced to U.S.

Native Origin: Europe

U.S. Present: AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, ME, MI, MN, MO, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK,OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY

Distribution:

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Leucanthemum vulgare
EDDMapS: Leucanthemum vulgare
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Leucanthemum vulgare

Invaders of Texas Observations

List All Observations of Leucanthemum vulgare reported by Citizen Scientists

Resembles/Alternatives

Management

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

University of California (http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/datastore/detailreport.cfm?usernumber=59&surveynumber=182)

Online Resources

Search Online

Google Search: Leucanthemum vulgare
Google Images: Leucanthemum vulgare
NatureServe Explorer: Leucanthemum vulgare
USDA Plants: Leucanthemum vulgare
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Leucanthemum vulgare
Bugwood Network Images: Leucanthemum vulgare

Last Updated: 2007-07-27 by DEW
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